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Valery Blokhin
Valery Blokhin

Karateka [UPD]


The game received generally favorable reviews from critics. In early 1985, Jeff Hurlbert of Hardcore Computist said the "recently-released" Karateka "is the most recent and best illustration of a trend towards computer games that look like movies". He called it "a breakthrough" where art "merges with technology to produce a game almost as much fun to watch as to play".[26] In January 1985, Computer Entertainer rated the Apple II version 7 out of 8 stars, praising the visuals, animation, sound effects, music, karate moves, and story line, but criticizing the blonde-haired appearance of the karateka and princess in a Japanese setting.[27] Computer Entertainer later rated the Commodore 64 version seven out of eight stars in July 1985, praising the "visually stunning" graphics and "authentic" moves, but again questioning "the use of a blond hero and heroine in a Japanese setting".[1] In May 1985, Enter praised the "beautiful graphics, superb animation and realistic sound effects". Billy Gillette called it "a four-star game" but was disappointed with the lack of a score, and Phil Wiswell criticized the lack of a two-player option but concluded with, "wow, what a game!"[28] In October 1985, Compute! called Karateka "a nominee for the Most Underrated Program of the Year. It's a program that must be seen to be fully appreciated". Although criticizing the necessity to restart from the beginning upon defeat, the review stated that the Apple II version "has by far the best animation I've seen in an Apple arcade game. The smoothness of the animation ... makes the game almost as enjoyable to watch as it is to play".[29]




Karateka


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The title is derived from the Japanese word 空手家 (pronounced /kəratɛka/), meaning 'practitioner of karate'. The title is often mispronounced as /kærateɪka/, and was even said incorrectly in a television commercial for the Atari 7800. In proper Japanese, however, it would be pronounced /karateka/.


The goal of this work was to find differences between the somatotypes of elite karateka. For this purpose the somatotypes of Conrad, Heath & Carter were used. This sports anthropological study was carried out on the assumption that constant karate training causes changes in body composition. It should clarify whether different body types, including sexual dimorphism, are to be found in people practicing the karate disciplines kata and kumite. 80 male and female elite karateka were tested. As a comparison group, 62 leisure sports persons and 66 hobby karateka were used as control groups. The measurements were taken under standardised conditions and the results were examined statistically (ANOVA). The body types of Conrad, which were confirmed by the somatocharts of Heath & Carter, showed differences between the elite karateka in comparison to the control group. According to this, the typical elite karateka is more athletic and smaller. He weighs less than the sports persons of the comparison fitness group. Moreover, within the karate disciplines, the kata practisers are more endomorph than their colleagues. The kumite athletes take more ektomorph positions in the somatocharts (Heath & Carter 1990). On the basis of these results the assumption of a differentiated somatotype can be confirmed in the two groups and also within karate between the disciplines kata and kumite. This study concludes that there is both a kata and a kumite somatotype among karate practisers. Further research is required regarding longitudinal measurements of the change in body composition of young karateka in the course of their competitive careers. The career-affecting factors of training frequency, training age, and frequency of injury, related to the level of achievement, leave room for further investigation. This also applies to possible ethnic body-build differences and the athletes' level of achievement.


Problem. The purpose of this study is to examine the direct influence of karateka (karate practitioner) Gichin Funakoshi on Jigoro Kano, the founder of judo, and the founders of Korea's national sport, taekwondo, especially Won Kuk Lee and Byung Jick Ro. Kano founded Seiryoku zen'yō Kokumin Taiiku (National Physical Education According to the Principle of Best Use of Energy) in 1924, but the movements seemed to have been greatly influenced by Karate. This study takes up two questions: First, how did Gichin Funakoshi influence Jigoro Kano. And second, how did Gichin Funakoshi influence taekwondo leaders. Method. This study is historical research based on relevant data analysis. In the question 1, the solo moves of Shotokan karate-do with the seiryoku zen'yō kokumin taiiku style were compared. In the question 2, literature and newspaper articles about karate and taekwondo from Korea and Japan are analyzed to investigate the motivations, objectives, and beliefs of Funakoshi and early Korean taekwondo leaders for their martial arts practice. Results. As a result, this study has found: (1) Funakoshi's karate style and Kano's seiryoku zen'yō kokumin taiiku style shared some similarities, especially in terms of punching, kicking. Differences were found in the direction of punches, standing postures and simultaneity of upper-body defense in kicking attacks. (2) Lee and Ro practiced karate at the Shotokan dojo by Funakoshi while they were studying in Japan. They were influenced by Funakoshi' training method, kata (a series of fixed technique motion for selfpracticing), and philosophy, which led them to found the first Karate school (the original version of Taekwondo school) in Korea around the time of Korea's liberation in 1945.


N2 - Problem. The purpose of this study is to examine the direct influence of karateka (karate practitioner) Gichin Funakoshi on Jigoro Kano, the founder of judo, and the founders of Korea's national sport, taekwondo, especially Won Kuk Lee and Byung Jick Ro. Kano founded Seiryoku zen'yō Kokumin Taiiku (National Physical Education According to the Principle of Best Use of Energy) in 1924, but the movements seemed to have been greatly influenced by Karate. This study takes up two questions: First, how did Gichin Funakoshi influence Jigoro Kano. And second, how did Gichin Funakoshi influence taekwondo leaders. Method. This study is historical research based on relevant data analysis. In the question 1, the solo moves of Shotokan karate-do with the seiryoku zen'yō kokumin taiiku style were compared. In the question 2, literature and newspaper articles about karate and taekwondo from Korea and Japan are analyzed to investigate the motivations, objectives, and beliefs of Funakoshi and early Korean taekwondo leaders for their martial arts practice. Results. As a result, this study has found: (1) Funakoshi's karate style and Kano's seiryoku zen'yō kokumin taiiku style shared some similarities, especially in terms of punching, kicking. Differences were found in the direction of punches, standing postures and simultaneity of upper-body defense in kicking attacks. (2) Lee and Ro practiced karate at the Shotokan dojo by Funakoshi while they were studying in Japan. They were influenced by Funakoshi' training method, kata (a series of fixed technique motion for selfpracticing), and philosophy, which led them to found the first Karate school (the original version of Taekwondo school) in Korea around the time of Korea's liberation in 1945.


AB - Problem. The purpose of this study is to examine the direct influence of karateka (karate practitioner) Gichin Funakoshi on Jigoro Kano, the founder of judo, and the founders of Korea's national sport, taekwondo, especially Won Kuk Lee and Byung Jick Ro. Kano founded Seiryoku zen'yō Kokumin Taiiku (National Physical Education According to the Principle of Best Use of Energy) in 1924, but the movements seemed to have been greatly influenced by Karate. This study takes up two questions: First, how did Gichin Funakoshi influence Jigoro Kano. And second, how did Gichin Funakoshi influence taekwondo leaders. Method. This study is historical research based on relevant data analysis. In the question 1, the solo moves of Shotokan karate-do with the seiryoku zen'yō kokumin taiiku style were compared. In the question 2, literature and newspaper articles about karate and taekwondo from Korea and Japan are analyzed to investigate the motivations, objectives, and beliefs of Funakoshi and early Korean taekwondo leaders for their martial arts practice. Results. As a result, this study has found: (1) Funakoshi's karate style and Kano's seiryoku zen'yō kokumin taiiku style shared some similarities, especially in terms of punching, kicking. Differences were found in the direction of punches, standing postures and simultaneity of upper-body defense in kicking attacks. (2) Lee and Ro practiced karate at the Shotokan dojo by Funakoshi while they were studying in Japan. They were influenced by Funakoshi' training method, kata (a series of fixed technique motion for selfpracticing), and philosophy, which led them to found the first Karate school (the original version of Taekwondo school) in Korea around the time of Korea's liberation in 1945. 041b061a72


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