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Daniel Hall
Daniel Hall

Low Interest Credit Card



  • Why this is one of the best low-interest credit cards: This card comes with a 0% intro APR for 15 months, which can help you save on interest from purchases or a balance transfer, then a 16.49% to 27.49% variable APR applies.

  • The top features: With the Discover it Cash Back card, you can earn 5% cash back on everyday purchases at places such as Amazon.com, grocery stores, restaurants and gas stations, up to the quarterly maximum when you activate and unlimited 1% cash back on all other purchases. Plus, as an introductory offer, Discover will automatically match all the cash back you've earned at the end of your first year.

  • Another card to consider: The BankAmericard credit card offers a 0% introductory APR for 21 billing cycles on purchases and on balance transfers made within the first 60 days of opening your account, then a comparable variable APR to the Discover it Cash Back card.

See our full review.




low interest credit card


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  • Why this is one of the best low-interest credit cards: Cardholders get a 0% intro APR for 15 months for purchases and balance transfers and a $0 annual fee.

  • The top features: With Discover it chrome, gas and restaurant purchases earn 2% cash back on up to $1,000 in combined purchases each quarter, and 1% cash back on all other purchases.

  • Another card to consider: The Discover it Cash Back card offers a similar 0% intro APR for 15 months on purchases and balance transfers, then a 16.49% - 27.49% Variable APR applies. Plus a 5% cash back rate on a variety of purchase categories and 1% cash back on all other purchases.

See our full review.


Why this is one of the best low-interest credit cards: This card has real appeal for those looking to do a balance transfer. The card offers a 0% Intro APR for 21 months on balance transfers from date of first transfer and 0% Intro APR for 12 months on purchases from date of account opening. After that the variable APR will be 17.74% to 28.49% variable, based on your creditworthiness. See our full review.


Why this is one of the best low-interest credit cards: The Citi Rewards+ Card comes with a 0% introductory annual percentage rate on balance transfers and purchases for the first 15 months. After that, the variable APR will be 18.24% to 28.24% (variable) based on your creditworthiness. See our full review.


  • Why this is one of the best low-interest credit cards: This card offers a 0% introductory APR for 21 billing cycles on purchases and on balance transfers made within the first 60 days of opening your account.

  • The top features: There is no annual fee and no penalty APR for this card.

  • Another card to consider: The Discover it Balance Transfer card offers a range of cash back rewards, plus a 18-month 0% introductory APR on eligible balance transfers and a six-month 0% introductory APR on purchases, after which a 16.49% - 27.49% Variable APR applies.

See our full review.


A low-interest card with a 0% introductory APR likely keeps that promotional rate for 12 to 21 months and charges a balance transfer fee of 3% to 5%. If you plan to transfer a balance to pay off debt and save on interest, remember to account for this fee when calculating your monthly payment so you can make sure to clear the charges during the introductory window.


1. Decide whether to apply for a low-interest credit card, a 0% APR card or both. If you run into a financial emergency and need to carry a balance for a few months, then these options could help you avoid racking up tons of interest charges. But be sure to weigh whether you should apply for a new credit card at all.


2. Compare APRs. Aim to find the card that fits your needs with the lowest APR. Keep in mind that other factors, including balance transfer offers, annual fees and additional charges, may outweigh the benefit of having the absolutely lowest APR.


3. Subtract annual fees. Some credit cards charge annual fees. If you choose a card with an annual fee, be sure this charge doesn't outweigh your interest savings. And if you plan to transfer a balance to pay off debt, make sure the annual fee won't slow your progress on paying down the balance.


5. Compare cardholder benefits. Many credit cards have benefits, including rental car insurance, cellphone protection and extended warranty coverage. When you take advantage of these types of perks, you get extra value from the card.


6. Estimate rewards. Plenty of credit cards that earn cash back rewards, miles or points for purchases also offer deals such as 0% interest on balance transfers for a limited period. But balance transfers usually don't earn rewards, and you should try to wait until you pay off a transferred balance before you use your card for new purchases.


All it takes is some simple math to figure out whether a low-interest credit card will save you money in the long run. Let's look at one scenario to see how easy it can be to calculate your savings, or lack thereof.


If you use a low-interest credit card with no balance for a $2,500 purchase and then put $150 toward it monthly, how much could you save? If you use a card with a purchase APR of 18%, you will pay about $2,899, including about $399 in interest. With a low-interest card that has a purchase APR of 14%, you will pay about $2,796, including about $296 in interest.


1. Pay off your balance. The best way to pay less credit card interest is to pay off your balance by the due date each month. If your card has a balance, you can save a lot in interest just by making more than the minimum payment.


If you have debt to pay off on several credit cards, you can prioritize it either by APR, starting with the highest, or by balance, beginning with the lowest. Paying off cards from highest APR to lowest APR, though, will save the most money.


Research what comparable cards charge, and have those details on hand when you call. Issuers don't want to lose your business and may be willing to match a competitor's rate if you have been a good customer.


3. Consolidate debt with a 0% APR credit card. You can transfer credit card debt to a new card with a 0% APR period that buys you time to make interest-free payments. The length of this interest-free window depends on the card, but it could be 12 to 18 months. You may also be required to complete your balance transfers within a certain time.


Expect to pay a balance transfer fee of 3% to 5%. Even then, you can still knock out debt faster than you would otherwise because all payments during the interest-free period go toward your principal balance.


4. Get a low-interest card for future spending. You'll have your pick of cards if your credit score is good. If you frequently carry a balance, look for a card with a low ongoing rate. A card with a 0% introductory APR might be better if you plan to carry a balance only in the short term.


A low-interest credit card is a credit card that charges a low APR. For this list, U.S. News considers cards with an ongoing minimum APR of 17.99% or lower and a 0% APR offer of 14 months or more for purchases or balance transfers.


There are multiple ways to lower the interest rate on your credit card. One way is to call your credit card issuer and request a lower interest rate. Another option is to transfer your balance to a balance transfer card, which typically requires a credit score of at least 670.


Choosing a lower interest credit card means that you can help pay off balances faster. The lower APR helps make your monthly statementslower by paying less in interest. This can be especially helpful if you sometimes carry a balance. Our lower interest credit card even has nopenalty rate, so you keep that same low APR if you make a late payment. We also offer Late Fee Grace and provide an additional 24 hours tomake a missed payment.


Annual Percentage Rate, or APR, determines the cost of credit for a year and is the interest rate you pay on a loan as it relates to credit cards, mortgages, auto loans, etc. APR is commonly used to compare individual products like a credit card from various lenders before you make your decision. APR can be fixed or variable. Most credit card issuers base their variable rate on the U.S. Prime Rate with an additional margin applied. There are also various types of APRs for credit cards like purchase APR, cash advance APR, or balance transfer APR. Learn more about what APR is and what it means to you.


John Kiernan has covered the credit card industry for more than 10 years as a writer and editor for WalletHub. His work has been featured by major media outlets such as The Washington Post and The New York Times and has been cited by industry regulators such as the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.Full Author Bio


For starters, lots of credit cards offer 0% APR periods as introductory perks for new customers. They can be a great help to people looking to finance a large purchase or transfer a debt to pay it off faster. But those intro periods are always temporary. Most (but not all) 0% APR credit cards require good credit or better, too.


To get a low interest credit card, start by checking your credit score and figuring out how long you expect to need a low interest rate for, in addition to why you need it. Low interest credit cards usually require good credit or better, and low rates are available for new purchases as well as balance transfers.


A low APR for a credit card is below 15.16% if you have excellent credit. For people with lower credit scores, credit cards with good low APRs may charge interest at a rate closer to 20% after any low-interest introductory periods end. 041b061a72


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